Review: The Favorite Daughter by Patti Callahan Henry

Paperback, 368 pages                                    ISBN13: 9780399583131

Published June 4th 2019 by Berkley Books     Rating: 5*.  

I am sorry to say that this was my first experience in reading this author’s work, but after this taste of her prose, visualization and emotional pull on my very soul, it will not be the last.  What a blessing it is to discover an author who can write such a moving and relatable tale with such insight into the aftermath of both the protagonists aching hearts.  

It was ten years ago, when Lena Donohue experienced a wedding-day betrayal so painful that she fled the small town of Watersend, South Carolina.   After coming to terms with broken heart she reinvented herself in New York City. Now as a freelance travel writer, the one place she rarely goes is home – until she learns of her dad’s failing health.

Returning to Watersend means seeing the sister she has avoided for a decade. But she can’t ignore her brother who runs the family’s Irish pub and has borne the burden of his sisters’ rift and the brunt of watching his father slowly succumb to the despicable disease of  Alzheimer’s.   Seeing firsthand how their father’s memories are slipping away, the siblings rush to preserve his life in stories and in photographs.  While doing the research into her father’s life and memories, some inaccuracies started to unfold which lead Lena to discover the truth of what set her apart from her best friend and sister even before the betrayal of the wedding day disaster.  

I admit to being easily and emotionally moved and truthfully I had to put this book down several times before I could continue reading because of the tears that came to my eyes.   However, I wouldn’t have missed the chance to experience this story and thank God that I had the opportunity to read and review!   Excellent and brilliant!

Marilyn Rondeau

Review: Montauk by Nicola Harrison

Montauk, Long Island, 1938. Once a humble fishing village and now it is serving as a playground for the New York City wealthy elite.  When her husband approached her with the plan to summer in Montauk, Beatrice Bordeaux was delighted thinking it would be just the ticket to help reignite the passion in her and Harry’s  marriage – that is until she understood that he would not be spending the weeks with her – just the weekends.  But, soon Harry had excuses that he wouldn’t be able to make the weekends because of being so busy pursuing other interests in the city.  

Raised as a country girl in Pennsylvania, Bea has never felt fully comfortable among these privileged women, whose days were devoted not to their children but to leisure activities and charities that seemingly benefit no one but themselves. Beatrice longs to be a mother herself, as well as a loving wife, but after five years of marriage she still remains childless while Harry is increasingly remote and distracted.  In spite of the  lavish parties at the Manor and the Yacht Club, Bea is lost and lonely and befriends the manor’s laundress whose work ethic and family life stir memories of who she once was. 

Exploring the town rather than joining the society women at the Manor Beatrice drifts further from the them and their preoccupations and closer toward Montauk’s natural beauty and community spirit.  Along the way, Bea finds herself drawn to a man nothing like her husband –stoic, plain spoken and enigmatic.  He  inspired her to face a haunting tragedy of her past and take a good look at what her future might hold.  

Time was racing and as the summer was coming to an end, Beatrice knew she had to make a choice to grasp what happiness she could.  However with a major hurricane blasting out to Long Island, would anyone survive to have a future.

Marilyn Rondeau